Running From Suspicion

Flo Jo was dirty.
Jackie Joyner-Kersey was clean.
Ben Johnson, Tim Montgomery, Kelli White and all shot putters – dirty.
Carl Lewis and Michael Johnson – clean.
Marion Jones is clean. I think. I hope. Actually, I really do think she is. She doesn’t need to cheat. When she just missed qualifying for the US Olympic team as a high school senior, she certainly wasn’t on steroids. When she then took a few years off from track to play basketball at UNC, winning a national title along the way, she had no reason to take performance enhancing drugs. Fresh off of her hoops success, when she picked track back up and immediately became the world’s best, she still had no reason to cheat. She had never failed. She had never felt that she needed an extra edge to beat anyone. All she needed to do was get in shape and train a little and the track world was hers. Talent was her edge
Others have taken different roads. It was never proven, but there’s not a doubt in my mind that Florence Griffith-Joyner took steroids. No doubt. She was a very good runner for most of her career, but never the best. She didn’t win any golds at the World Championships or Olympics. She did win a silver in the 1984 Olympics (which the Russians boycotted) and then retired. In 1987 she burst back onto the scene a different woman. She looked different, covered in muscles, and she certainly ran different. Flo Jo immediately began smashing records, including taking an unthinkable three-tenths of a second off of the 100m world record. Her time of 10.49 hasn’t been even remotely approached since she abruptly retired not long after the 1988 Olympics (and just before the start of mandatory random drug testing of all Olympic athletes).
With Marion, there is no reason on the track to suspect that she cheats. She has dominated the sport as few others have, but she never had any meteoric rise from mediocrity. She never suddenly lowered her times – she was always good.
No, Marion’s problems have been her stunningly dumb off-track associations. I understand that you can’t choose who you fall in love with, but for an athlete of her magnitude, she certainly could have been more careful. First, she fell in love with and married her former college coach CJ Hunter. Hunter was a world-class shot putter who famously failed a series of drug tests just before the 2000 Olympics. He was kicked off the team and Jones separated from him and eventually divorced him a short time later.
Unfortunately, Marion then eventually hooked up with Tim Montgomery. Montgomery was a bit like Flo Jo – world class, but never the best. He routinely finished behind stars like Maurice Greene. Then, in 2002, he suddenly began winning top-flight meets. That fall, he had the race of his life, beating Greene’s world record in a time of 9.78 (a half of a tenth faster than Ben Johnson’s brief world record from 1988).
Montgomery and Jones first raised eyebrows in early 2003 when they hired Charlie Francis as their new coach. Francis is infamous in the track and field community for being the coach of Ben Johnson. Francis was banned from the Canadian national team after he admitted giving Johnson steroids. Francis seems to have no problems giving his athletes steroids, saying “If anyone is clean, it’s going to be the losers.” (Click here for an incredible interview with this scumbag.)
Montgomery and Jones soon fired Francis after tons of pressure from the media and track federations. Unfortunately, it wasn’t that long before the BALCO case came to light. Both Montgomery and Marion were called to testify before a grand jury in the federal case against BALCO and Victor Comte for illegally creating and distributing steroids. That investigation turned up evidence that Montgomery was on a BALCO-administered steroid schedule at the time he broke the world record (this is a great article on Montgomery’s troubles). No public information has come out linking Marion directly to BALCO (although you will frequently read articles that talk about the check written to Comte from “her bank account.” That check was signed by CJ Hunter, her husband at the time. Since spouses commonly share bank accounts and since Hunter tested positive for steroids, I hardly see how this “evidence” says anything about Marion.), but that hasn’t stopped the suspicion.
This suspicion came to a head in recent meeting between Marion, her lawyer and the head of U.S. Anti-Doping Agency. Marion and her lawyer called the meeting to try to find out why she was being investigated. After the meeting, her lawyer said that they offered to let the USADA test any old samples of her urine that they had, but found that the USADA had kept none. According to her lawyer, Joseph Burton, the USADA presented no hard evidence of any sort. The USADA says that they could potentially suspend Jones even without any failed tests, that their anecdotal evidence could be enough. What evidence they have is not clear.
What is clear is that Marion Jones has no one to blame but herself. I think she’s clean; she’s never failed a test and she says she’s willing to take a test at any time. Her problem is that she’s surrounded herself with cheaters. Usually, where there’s smoke, there’s fire. I hope in this case it is just second-hand smoke.
I think that Marion Jones is clean. I think.
Updates:
More Smoke
Another Sprinter Nailed
Montgomery In Crosshairs
The USADA Details Evidence On Montgomery’s Doping
Kornheiser: Is Marion A Duck?
More Red Flags

Odds ‘n’ Ends

I haven’t had any one topic in my head recently that’s worthy of its own entry, so I’m going the pot luck supper route. Little bit of everything here.
—————
I loved reading about JR Smith and how he used his performances in the high school All Star games as the ultimate sign that he was ready for the NBA. High school All Star games? You mean those ones where a bunch of guys who’ve never played together get out there and throw each other alley-oops? Those “no defense allowed” games? That’s some great thinking there, JR! In fact, I read yesterday that Frankie Munoz, fresh off his stellar performance in MTV’s Rock and Jock hoops game, has declared for the draft as well. He’s projected as a mid second round pick.
—————
So, Dick Vitale is “amazed” that no one has jumped to hire Matt Doherty yet. I can just see the interview – “Matt, we really like your hair, but we’re concerned about this last entry on your resume. Now, can you possibly explain how you managed to screw up one of the easiest, most powerful jobs in the business? Didn’t you have immediate access to the living rooms of every top prospect in the country? Didn’t you have immediate access to Dean Smith, one of the top minds in college basketball history? Weren’t you taking over a program that had just been to two Final Fours in the previous three years and still had enough talent to be ranked #1 in your first year? Didn’t you manage to piss off every single person in and around the basketball program, including Dean, the nicest man in America? Can you explain all of this?”
Yeah, I’m shocked too, Dick.
—————
So, this past weekend I go to take a leak. As I’m getting ready, I see something no one should ever see down there. A tick. Of all the places to find a blood-sucking parasite, that’s way down on the bottom of the list. I hope I don’t get Rocky Mountain Spotted Dick.
Incidentally, that’s only the second worst taking-a-leak discovery of mine. A few years ago, not long after moving into my new house, I was doing some yardwork – trimming shrubs, pulling weeds, etc. At some point, I went inside to take a leak. Well, nothing too bad happened then. Or so I thought. A few days later, I found out (the hard way) that my yard has poison ivy. Talk about the itch that you just can’t scratch.
—————
I still get tons of search hits to my site from people looking for news on the Mike Danton case. So, this update’s for you, my Google searchers.
About two weeks ago, Mike Danton called a reporter at the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and read a two-page statement written on a yellow legal pad. Danton wouldn’t budge from the script of the statement and reread some passages twice to make sure the reporter got the words verbatim. Among other things, the statement praised David Frost, the controlling psychopath that Danton tried to have killed, and criticized Danton’s family. David Frost was sitting with Danton as he read the statement (and Danton’s attorney had no idea this was happening). Gee, that sounds perfectly normal, right? Is there even the slightest chance that David Frost didn’t write that statement himself?
Fortunately, the judge in the case had some common sense and ordered Frost to stay away from Danton. You just don’t need the guy who completely control’s Danton’s life, the guy who Danton decided he needed to have killed, in there meddling with Danton’s trial. Actually, a better idea would be to chuck Frost in the clink as well, and let him try his mind control techniques on Bubba, his cellmate.
A few days ago, a judge denied bail for Danton, meaning he must stay in jail until his trial. That’s a fairly unusual step, but in this case, the judge feared that Danton would flee or kill himself. It was probably a wise choice, although it sucks for Danton.
Some interesting stuff came out of the bail hearing, namely that in the 12 days that Danton was held in a jail in California after being arrested, he talked to Frost on the phone 79 times. 79 times!
That Frost is one scary dude. I like hearing the prosecutors in the case talk about possible Obstruction of Justice charges for him. He’s the real bad guy in this case, not Mike Danton.
—————
In this week’s Sports Illustrated, they had a little article about Duke’s women’s golf team. SI compared them to the best women’s teams of all time and determined that this year’s Duke team was the best women’s golf team ever.
Whoops.
This weekend, the best team ever came in third in the NCAA championships. That’s why you wait to write those articles until after a team actually accomplishes something.
I suppose in this week’s SI, we’ll find out that the ’92 UNLV team was the best college basketball team ever.
—————
Jay Bilas has a nice article up on espn.com (thanks Yoni!) about the myth that college basketball coaches can’t make it in the NBA. He does a good job describing thoughts I’ve had on the subject. His main points are that college coaches usually take over bad teams and that most NBA coaches “fail.” Teams wouldn’t be hiring new coaches if the last one had done a good job (well, unless it’s Detroit). And look at how many NBA coaches get fired every year. According to the standard that says that Lon Kruger, Rick Pitino and John Calipari are failures, so are Byron Scott, Lenny Wilkens (how many times has that guy been fired?), Dick Motta, Hubie Brown, and just about every NBA coach out there.
I’m not saying all college coaches are cut out for the NBA, but to say that the NBA is much harder than college is ludicrous. If anything, it’s easier, because they don’t have as many different styles to coach against and they don’t have to (well, maybe they should, but that’s a different story) spend time teaching individual skills.
—————
No ACC teams made the men’s lacrosse Final Four (but Virginia won the women’s title). Syracuse did make it though, for the 22nd time in a row. Even though there aren’t that many D1 teams, 22 times in a row is simply mind boggling.

½I haven’t had any one topic in my head recently that’s worthy of its own entry, so I’m going the pot luck supper route. Little bit of everything here.
—————
I loved reading about JR Smith and how he used his performances in the high school All Star games as the ultimate sign that he was ready for the NBA. High school All Star games? You mean those ones where a bunch of guys who’ve never played together get out there and throw each other alley-oops? Those “no defense allowed” games? That’s some great thinking there, JR! In fact, I read yesterday that Frankie Munoz, fresh off his stellar performance in MTV’s Rock and Jock hoops game, has declared for the draft as well. He’s projected as a mid second round pick.
—————
So, Dick Vitale is “amazed” that no one has jumped to hire Matt Doherty yet. I can just see the interview – “Matt, we really like your hair, but we’re concerned about this last entry on your resume. Now, can you possibly explain how you managed to screw up one of the easiest, most powerful jobs in the business? Didn’t you have immediate access to the living rooms of every top prospect in the country? Didn’t you have immediate access to Dean Smith, one of the top minds in college basketball history? Weren’t you taking over a program that had just been to two Final Fours in the previous three years and still had enough talent to be ranked #1 in your first year? Didn’t you manage to piss off every single person in and around the basketball program, including Dean, the nicest man in America? Can you explain all of this?”
Yeah, I’m shocked too, Dick.
—————
So, this past weekend I go to take a leak. As I’m getting ready, I see something no one should ever see down there. A tick. Of all the places to find a blood-sucking parasite, that’s way down on the bottom of the list. I hope I don’t get Rocky Mountain Spotted Dick.
Incidentally, that’s only the second worst taking-a-leak discovery of mine. A few years ago, not long after moving into my new house, I was doing some yardwork – trimming shrubs, pulling weeds, etc. At some point, I went inside to take a leak. Well, nothing too bad happened then. Or so I thought. A few days later, I found out (the hard way) that my yard has poison ivy. Talk about the itch that you just can’t scratch.
—————
I still get tons of search hits to my site from people looking for news on the Mike Danton case. So, this update’s for you, my Google searchers.
About two weeks ago, Mike Danton called a reporter at the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and read a two-page statement written on a yellow legal pad. Danton wouldn’t budge from the script of the statement and reread some passages twice to make sure the reporter got the words verbatim. Among other things, the statement praised David Frost, the controlling psychopath that Danton tried to have killed, and criticized Danton’s family. David Frost was sitting with Danton as he read the statement (and Danton’s attorney had no idea this was happening). Gee, that sounds perfectly normal, right? Is there even the slightest chance that David Frost didn’t write that statement himself?
Fortunately, the judge in the case had some common sense and ordered Frost to stay away from Danton. You just don’t need the guy who completely control’s Danton’s life, the guy who Danton decided he needed to have killed, in there meddling with Danton’s trial. Actually, a better idea would be to chuck Frost in the clink as well, and let him try his mind control techniques on Bubba, his cellmate.
A few days ago, a judge denied bail for Danton, meaning he must stay in jail until his trial. That’s a fairly unusual step, but in this case, the judge feared that Danton would flee or kill himself. It was probably a wise choice, although it sucks for Danton.
Some interesting stuff came out of the bail hearing, namely that in the 12 days that Danton was held in a jail in California after being arrested, he talked to Frost on the phone 79 times. 79 times!
That Frost is one scary dude. I like hearing the prosecutors in the case talk about possible Obstruction of Justice charges for him. He’s the real bad guy in this case, not Mike Danton.
—————
In this week’s Sports Illustrated, they had a little article about Duke’s women’s golf team. SI compared them to the best women’s teams of all time and determined that this year’s Duke team was the best women’s golf team ever.
Whoops.
This weekend, the best team ever came in third in the NCAA championships. That’s why you wait to write those articles until after a team actually accomplishes something.
I suppose in this week’s SI, we’ll find out that the ’92 UNLV team was the best college basketball team ever.
—————
Jay Bilas has a nice article up on espn.com (thanks Yoni!) about the myth that college basketball coaches can’t make it in the NBA. He does a good job describing thoughts I’ve had on the subject. His main points are that college coaches usually take over bad teams and that most NBA coaches “fail.” Teams wouldn’t be hiring new coaches if the last one had done a good job (well, unless it’s Detroit). And look at how many NBA coaches get fired every year. According to the standard that says that Lon Kruger, Rick Pitino and John Calipari are failures, so are Byron Scott, Lenny Wilkens (how many times has that guy been fired?), Dick Motta, Hubie Brown, and just about every NBA coach out there.
I’m not saying all college coaches are cut out for the NBA, but to say that the NBA is much harder than college is ludicrous. If anything, it’s easier, because they don’t have as many different styles to coach against and they don’t have to (well, maybe they should, but that’s a different story) spend time teaching individual skills.
—————
No ACC teams made the men’s lacrosse Final Four (but Virginia won the women’s title). Syracuse did make it though, for the 22nd time in a row. Even though there aren’t that

½I haven’t had any one topic in my head recently that’s worthy of its own entry, so I’m going the pot luck supper route. Little bit of everything here.
—————
I loved reading about JR Smith and how he used his performances in the high school All Star games as the ultimate sign that he was ready for the NBA. High school All Star games? You mean those ones where a bunch of guys who’ve never played together get out there and throw each other alley-oops? Those “no defense allowed” games? That’s some great thinking there, JR! In fact, I read yesterday that Frankie Munoz, fresh off his stellar performance in MTV’s Rock and Jock hoops game, has declared for the draft as well. He’s projected as a mid second round pick.
—————
So, Dick Vitale is “amazed” that no one has jumped to hire Matt Doherty yet. I can just see the interview – “Matt, we really like your hair, but we’re concerned about this last entry on your resume. Now, can you possibly explain how you managed to screw up one of the easiest, most powerful jobs in the business? Didn’t you have immediate access to the living rooms of every top prospect in the country? Didn’t you have immediate access to Dean Smith, one of the top minds in college basketball history? Weren’t you taking over a program that had just been to two Final Fours in the previous three years and still had enough talent to be ranked #1 in your first year? Didn’t you manage to piss off every single person in and around the basketball program, including Dean, the nicest man in America? Can you explain all of this?”
Yeah, I’m shocked too, Dick.
—————
So, this past weekend I go to take a leak. As I’m getting ready, I see something no one should ever see down there. A tick. Of all the places to find a blood-sucking parasite, that’s way down on the bottom of the list. I hope I don’t get Rocky Mountain Spotted Dick.
Incidentally, that’s only the second worst taking-a-leak discovery of mine. A few years ago, not long after moving into my new house, I was doing some yardwork – trimming shrubs, pulling weeds, etc. At some point, I went inside to take a leak. Well, nothing too bad happened then. Or so I thought. A few days later, I found out (the hard way) that my yard has poison ivy. Talk about the itch that you just can’t scratch.
—————
I still get tons of search hits to my site from people looking for news on the Mike Danton case. So, this update’s for you, my Google searchers.
About two weeks ago, Mike Danton called a reporter at the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and read a two-page statement written on a yellow legal pad. Danton wouldn’t budge from the script of the statement and reread some passages twice to make sure the reporter got the words verbatim. Among other things, the statement praised David Frost, the controlling psychopath that Danton tried to have killed, and criticized Danton’s family. David Frost was sitting with Danton as he read the statement (and Danton’s attorney had no idea this was happening). Gee, that sounds perfectly normal, right? Is there even the slightest chance that David Frost didn’t write that statement himself?
Fortunately, the judge in the case had some common sense and ordered Frost to stay away from Danton. You just don’t need the guy who completely control’s Danton’s life, the guy who Danton decided he needed to have killed, in there meddling with Danton’s trial. Actually, a better idea would be to chuck Frost in the clink as well, and let him try his mind control techniques on Bubba, his cellmate.
A few days ago, a judge denied bail for Danton, meaning he must stay in jail until his trial. That’s a fairly unusual step, but in this case, the judge feared that Danton would flee or kill himself. It was probably a wise choice, although it sucks for Danton.
Some interesting stuff came out of the bail hearing, namely that in the 12 days that Danton was held in a jail in California after being arrested, he talked to Frost on the phone 79 times. 79 times!
That Frost is one scary dude. I like hearing the prosecutors in the case talk about possible Obstruction of Justice charges for him. He’s the real bad guy in this case, not Mike Danton.
—————
In this week’s Sports Illustrated, they had a little article about Duke’s women’s golf team. SI compared them to the best women’s teams of all time and determined that this year’s Duke team was the best women’s golf team ever.
Whoops.
This weekend, the best team ever came in third in the NCAA championships. That’s why you wait to write those articles until after a team actually accomplishes something.
I suppose in this week’s SI, we’ll find out that the ’92 UNLV team was the best college basketball team ever.
—————
Jay Bilas has a nice article up on espn.com (thanks Yoni!) about the myth that college basketball coaches can’t make it in the NBA. He does a good job describing thoughts I’ve had on the subject. His main points are that college coaches usually take over bad teams and that most NBA coaches “fail.” Teams wouldn’t be hiring new coaches if the last one had done a good job (well, unless it’s Detroit). And look at how many NBA coaches get fired every year. According to the standard that says that Lon Kruger, Rick Pitino and John Calipari are failures, so are Byron Scott, Lenny Wilkens (how many times has that guy been fired?), Dick Motta, Hubie Brown, and just about every NBA coach out there.
I’m not saying all college coaches are cut out for the NBA, but to say that the NBA is much harder than college is ludicrous. If anything, it’s easier, because they don’t have as many different styles to coach against and they don’t have to (well, maybe they should, but that’s a different story) spend time teaching individual skills.
—————
No ACC teams made the men’s lacrosse Final Four (but Virginia won the women’s title). Syracuse did make it though, for the 22nd time in a row. Even though there aren’t that

½I haven’t had any one topic in my head recently that’s worthy of its own entry, so I’m going the pot luck supper route. Little bit of everything here.
—————
I loved reading about JR Smith and how he used his performances in the high school All Star games as the ultimate sign that he was ready for the NBA. High school All Star games? You mean those ones where a bunch of guys who’ve never played together get out there and throw each other alley-oops? Those “no defense allowed” games? That’s some great thinking there, JR! In fact, I read yesterday that Frankie Munoz, fresh off his stellar performance in MTV’s Rock and Jock hoops game, has declared for the draft as well. He’s projected as a mid second round pick.
—————
So, Dick Vitale is “amazed” that no one has jumped to hire Matt Doherty yet. I can just see the interview – “Matt, we really like your hair, but we’re concerned about this last entry on your resume. Now, can you possibly explain how you managed to screw up one of the easiest, most powerful jobs in the business? Didn’t you have immediate access to the living rooms of every top prospect in the country? Didn’t you have immediate access to Dean Smith, one of the top minds in college basketball history? Weren’t you taking over a program that had just been to two Final Fours in the previous three years and still had enough talent to be ranked #1 in your first year? Didn’t you manage to piss off every single person in and around the basketball program, including Dean, the nicest man in America? Can you explain all of this?”
Yeah, I’m shocked too, Dick.
—————
So, this past weekend I go to take a leak. As I’m getting ready, I see something no one should ever see down there. A tick. Of all the places to find a blood-sucking parasite, that’s way down on the bottom of the list. I hope I don’t get Rocky Mountain Spotted Dick.
Incidentally, that’s only the second worst taking-a-leak discovery of mine. A few years ago, not long after moving into my new house, I was doing some yardwork – trimming shrubs, pulling weeds, etc. At some point, I went inside to take a leak. Well, nothing too bad happened then. Or so I thought. A few days later, I found out (the hard way) that my yard has poison ivy. Talk about the itch that you just can’t scratch.
—————
I still get tons of search hits to my site from people looking for news on the Mike Danton case. So, this update’s for you, my Google searchers.
About two weeks ago, Mike Danton called a reporter at the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and read a two-page statement written on a yellow legal pad. Danton wouldn’t budge from the script of the statement and reread some passages twice to make sure the reporter got the words verbatim. Among other things, the statement praised David Frost, the controlling psychopath that Danton tried to have killed, and criticized Danton’s family. David Frost was sitting with Danton as he read the statement (and Danton’s attorney had no idea this was happening). Gee, that sounds perfectly normal, right? Is there even the slightest chance that David Frost didn’t write that statement himself?
Fortunately, the judge in the case had some common sense and ordered Frost to stay away from Danton. You just don’t need the guy who completely control’s Danton’s life, the guy who Danton decided he needed to have killed, in there meddling with Danton’s trial. Actually, a better idea would be to chuck Frost in the clink as well, and let him try his mind control techniques on Bubba, his cellmate.
A few days ago, a judge denied bail for Danton, meaning he must stay in jail until his trial. That’s a fairly unusual step, but in this case, the judge feared that Danton would flee or kill himself. It was probably a wise choice, although it sucks for Danton.
Some interesting stuff came out of the bail hearing, namely that in the 12 days that Danton was held in a jail in California after being arrested, he talked to Frost on the phone 79 times. 79 times!
That Frost is one scary dude. I like hearing the prosecutors in the case talk about possible Obstruction of Justice charges for him. He’s the real bad guy in this case, not Mike Danton.
—————
In this week’s Sports Illustrated, they had a little article about Duke’s women’s golf team. SI compared them to the best women’s teams of all time and determined that this year’s Duke team was the best women’s golf team ever.
Whoops.
This weekend, the best team ever came in third in the NCAA championships. That’s why you wait to write those articles until after a team actually accomplishes something.
I suppose in this week’s SI, we’ll find out that the ’92 UNLV team was the best college basketball team ever.
—————
Jay Bilas has a nice article up on espn.com (thanks Yoni!) about the myth that college basketball coaches can’t make it in the NBA. He does a good job describing thoughts I’ve had on the subject. His main points are that college coaches usually take over bad teams and that most NBA coaches “fail.” Teams wouldn’t be hiring new coaches if the last one had done a good job (well, unless it’s Detroit). And look at how many NBA coaches get fired every year. According to the standard that says that Lon Kruger, Rick Pitino and John Calipari are failures, so are Byron Scott, Lenny Wilkens (how many times has that guy been fired?), Dick Motta, Hubie Brown, and just about every NBA coach out there.
I’m not saying all college coaches are cut out for the NBA, but to say that the NBA is much harder than college is ludicrous. If anything, it’s easier, because they don’t have as many different styles to coach against and they don’t have to (well, maybe they should, but that’s a different story) spend time teaching individual skills.
—————
No ACC teams made the men’s lacrosse Final Four (but Virginia won the women’s title). Syracuse did make it though, for the 22nd time in a row. Even though there aren’t that